"Wall peckers" in Berlin, 10 November 1989. People started tearing down the Berlin Wall on their own. Official demolition began at Potsdamer Platz in November 1989, and continued from 20 February 1990 between the Brandenburg Gate and the border post at Checkpoint Charlie.
Source: Bundesregierung/Uwe Rau

Berlin grows together

"Wall peckers" in Berlin, 10 November 1989. People started tearing down the Berlin Wall on their own. Official demolition began at Potsdamer Platz in November 1989, and continued from 20 February 1990 between the Brandenburg Gate and the border post at Checkpoint Charlie.
Source: Bundesregierung/Uwe Rau
New Year's Eve celebration at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, 1989.
Source: ullstein bild/Böning
The first all-Berlin New Year's run on 1 January 1990 went through the Brandenburg Gate. The Gate marked the border between East and West up until German unification. Later it became the symbol of reunification.
Source: Hans-Peter Stiebing
Growing closer politically: members of the East and West German SPD took part together in a demonstration on 14 January 1990 to honour Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht. Walter Momper (3rd from l., West SPD), Ibrahim Böhme (4th from r., East SPD), Thomas Krüger (3rd from r., East SPD).
Source: ullstein bild/Bildarchiv
Removing the party insignia on the SED central committee building in East Berlin. Photo from February 1990, after the SED was renamed PDS.
Source: Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft/Volker Döring
The mayor of West Berlin, Walter Momper (l.), and East Berlin's mayor, Tino Schwierzina (r.), in East Berlin Town Hall during the first joint session of the Senate (West) and Municipal Authority (East), 12 June 1990.
Source: picture-alliance/dpa/Peter Kneffel
People in the Bernauer Straße area strolling on the former Berlin Wall death strip, which had been impassable just a few months before. The inner-city parts of the wall had largely been dismantled by early November 1990; the outer ring followed later.
Source: Hans-Peter Stiebing
Potsdamer Platz, 7 July 1990. Once a busy junction in Berlin, the square had been a wasteland for years with the Wall, barbed wire and the inner border strip. Now the markers of deterrence were gone.
Source: picture-alliance/dpa/Peter Kneffel
On 15 August 1990, Walter Momper (l.) and his East Berlin counterpart Tino Schwierzina (r.) banged the drum for Berlin as united Germany's future capital. In June 1991 the German parliament decided by a narrow majority that Berlin should be the capital of the newly united Federal Republic.
Source: Bundesregierung
Parallel to the general election, the first all-Berlin elections were held on 2 December 1990. The newly elected members of the Berlin assembly included Sebastian Pflugbeil (l.), Irena Kukutz and Reinhard Schult from the civil rights grouping New Forum.
Source: XPRESS/Rolf Walter
In 1992 there were protests against plans to allow traffic across the Oberbaumbrücke, the bridge between Kreuzberg (West Berlin) and Friedrichshain (East Berlin). Residents were worried about noise and environmental damage. Nevertheless, the bridge was finally opened on 9 November 1994, the 5th anniversary of the fall of the Wall.
Source: Umbruch Bildarchiv/Berlin
Berlin's inner city transport routes had been severed since the Wall was built in 1961. After the fall of the Wall, the first U-Bahn stations were re-opened. It took years for the transport network to be fully restored. By June 2002 passengers were able to use the entire S-Bahn ring again.
Source: picture-alliance/ZB/Wolfgang Kumm
West and East meeting up in Berlin. Small ads page in the Berliner Zeitung, 6 May 1990.
Source: Berliner Zeitung, 06.05.1990
On 14 June 1990 Berliners celebrated the official start of demolition of the Wall at the corner of Ackerstraße and Bernauer Straße between Wedding and Mitte.
Source: Bild Zeitung, 14.06.1990
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